The War Dead (Names beginning with ‘C’)

Charles Patrick Carey

Service Number: 9164, he was a Private in the 2nd Battalion of the South Wales Borderers. The son of Charles Patrick Carey, he was born in Wimbledon and lived at 36, Deburgh Road, South Wimbledon. He was killed in action at Gallipoli, aged 26, on 26th April 1915. On 25th April, British, Australian and New Zealand forces landed on the Gallipoli peninsula and three companies of 2nd South Wales Borderers, 87 Brigade, 29th Division, landed at “S” Beach, Helles. One company quickly overcame a Turkish battery whilst the other two took the Turkish trench in front of the beach. The Turks did not put up much resistance on this landing beach but nevertheless 2nd South Waleshad over 50 casualties, 13 of whom were killed. Another 6 men were missing and it was presumed that they had drowned during the landing. Charles Carey is commemorated on Panel 80-84 or 219 & 220 HELLES MEMORIAL

The Helles Memorial

Charles Frederick Case

Service Number TR/161757, he was a Private in the 53rd Battalion of the Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment). He was born in Croydon, Surrey and is recorded as having enlisted in London. He was repatriated, but died at home on 6th November 1918 and is buried in Grave – D. C4. 159. WIMBLEDON GAP ROAD CEMETERY

Wimbledon Gap Road Cemetery

Albert Edward Coe

Service Number38223, he was a Private in the 16th Battalion of the Lancashire Fusiliers. Born in Wimbledon in 1898 – and one of six children – he was the son of George and Esther Coe, of 19A, Cowper Rd, South Wimbledon. He enlisted into the army at Kingston and died of wounds in the Western European Theatre on 6th April 1918 at the age of 22.  He is buried in Grave – II. J. 9. GEZAINCOURT COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION

Gezaincourt Communal
Cemetery Extension

Stephen J. Cole

Service Number O/7095, he was a Corporal in the Royal Army Ordnance Corps. 61st Ordnance Ammunition Section. Born in Wimbledon in 1890, he was the son of Mirea Jeanet Cole – Temporary Domestic Cook – of 22, Hardy Road, South Wimbledon. A printer’s Holler Maker by trade he had one elder brother. He died on 11th July 1919 and is buried at C.2. BERTINCOURT CHATEAU BRITISH CEMETERY.

Bertincourt Chateau
British Cemetery

Albert Victor Coleman 

Service Number 67664, he served in the 3rd Battalion (London Regiment) Royal Fusiliers.  He was born in Mitcham and was the son of Mr & Mrs Coleman of 4, Cowper Road, Wimbledon. He enlisted in Wimbledon and died in Flanders on 7th October 1918 at the age of 19. He was awarded the Military Medal and  is buried at CABARET-ROUGE BRITISH CEMETERY, SOUCHEZ

Cabaret-Rouge British
Cemetery, Souchez

Walter William Coleman

Service Number 13282, he was a Private in the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers. He was born in Battersea and was enlisted into the army in Hounslow. He died at Gallipoli on 10th November 1915 and his grave is D. V. 6. PIETA MILITARY CEMETERY

Pieta Military Cemetery

Sydney Alpin Coley

Service Number PO/17372, he was a Private in the Royal Marine Light Infantry Portsmouth Bn. R.N. Division. Born in Battersea on the 29th November 1896, he was the son of Mr. and Mrs. William John Coley, of 4, Hotham Rd, South Wimbledon. A grocer’s porter by trade, he enlisted in London on 10th August 1914. He served with the Portsmouth Battalion at Dunkirk and then with the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force from February 1915 until his death as a result of wounds sustained at Gallipoli on 5th May 1915.  He was 21 years of age. The 1914 Star was issued to his father, but a request for a clasp was refused. On 25th April, British, Australian and New Zealand forces landed on the Gallipoli peninsula. The plan was that these forces would soon defeat a demoralised Turkish army. It was an heroic failure. During the night of 28th-29th April, the extent of the exhaustion of the Australian and New Zealand troops at ANZAC after four days and nights of continuous fighting became obvious and four battalions of the Royal Naval Division were sent there to take some of the burden. As yet there is no further information on the events of 5th May, 1915 that led to the death of Private Coley but there is a strong likelihood that it was sniper fire. He is commemorated on Panel 2 to 7. HELLES MEMORIAL 

Helles Memorial

Robert Spencer Collins

Service Number G2389, he was a Private in the 7th Battalion of the Queen’s Own, Royal West Kent. He was born in Dulwich and enlisted into the army in Wimbledon.  He was killed in action during the Battle of the Somme along with his comrade William Bowden on 13th July 1916 and is commemorated with him in All Saints’ Church and on the Pier & Face 11c. THIEPVAL MEMORIAL. At the time of his death he was married to Martha who received his effects of £8 10s.

The Thiepval Memorial

Sidney James Coomber

Service Number J/9521, he was an Able Seaman on the Royal Naval Ship H.M.S. “Inflexible.” He was the son of James and Jessie Coomber, of 25, Hotham Rd., South Wimbledon and died at Gallipoli on 15th April 1915 at the age of 21. He is commemorated at 9. CHATHAM NAVAL MEMORIAL.  

Chatham Naval Memorial

H.M.S. Inflexible was an Invincible-class battlecruiser of the British Royal Navy. She arrived at the Dardanelles on 24 January 1915 where she replaced Indefatigable as the flagship of the Mediterranean Fleet. She bombarded Turkish fortifications on 19 February, the start of the Battle of Gallipoli. Later, as she was turning in Eren Keui Bay, she was seriously damaged by a mine, probably about 100 kg (220 lb) in size that blew a large hole in her starboard bow and flooded the forward torpedo flat, drowning 39 men

H.M.S. Inflexible

George Alfred Couldridge

Service Number 9864, he was a Sergeant in ‘B’ Company – the 2nd Battalion of the East Surrey Regiment. Born in Chelsea, he was the eldest of four children and was the son of Thomas Joseph – a Shop Porter – and Mary Ann Couldridge, of 5, Grove Rd. A General Labourer by trade, he was enlisted into the army in Kingston and was killed in action at Flanders during the Battle of Frezenberg Ridgeon 11th May 1915 at the age of 25. By now widowed, his mother received his effects totalling £23 15s 6d. In April 1915 the Germans, using gas for the first time, launched an all out attack on the salient around the Belgian town of Ypres. On 8th May at dawn there was a violent bombardment on the front held by 28th Division on the Frezenberg Ridge. 2nd  East Surrey, 85 Brigade, were sent up in support of 83 Brigade and they were ordered to take up a position on the left of 1st  York & Lancaster then recapture the trenches lost on Frezenberg Ridge. Their attack was launched at 4pm but by the time they reached the road running south-east from Wieltje, the machine gun and artillery fire they were meeting was too fierce for them to continue. Here they dug in and, with other battalions moving up beside them, here they stayed during the 9th May and 10th May under intense and constant shell fire. This three day action resulted in casualties of over 250 for 2nd East Surrey. George Couldridge was one of those killed. He is commemorated on Panel 34.YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL.  His brother also fell

Ypres Menin Gate Memorial

William Ernest Couldridge

Service Number 9469, he was a Lance Corporal in ‘B’ Company – the 2nd Battalion of the East Surrey Regiment (The same as his brother). Born in Chelsea, he was the son of Thomas Joseph – a Shop Porter – and Mary Ann Couldridge, of 5, Grove Rd. South Wimbledon. He was enlisted into the army in Kingston at the age of 18 years and five months. He listed his trade as that of a butcher’s assistant.  He died just over a month before his brother at Flanders on 2nd April 1915. He is commemorated on II. B. 9. VOORMEZEELE ENCLOSURE No.3. His effects totalling £19 4s 10d were sent to his widowed mother.

Voormezeele Enclosure

Frederick Henry Cox

Service Number 11224, he was a Lance Corporal in the 1st Battalion of the East Surrey Regiment. Born in Wimbledon in 1898, he was the son of Frederick and Annie Sarah Cox – a Charwoman – of 11, Leyton Rd., South Wimbledon. He was enlisted into the army at Kingston. He died in Exeter Hospital of wounds aged 20, on the 5th December 1917 and his grave is C. C4. 24. WIMBLEDON (GAP ROAD) CEMETERY. The Exeter hospitals were first-line hospitals, taking patients direct from ambulance trains from Southampton. By the time of his death Frederick’s mother had been widowed and she received his effects of £22 12s 3d.

Wimbledon Gap Road

John Henry Cross

Service Number 6953, he was a Private in the 2nd Battalion of the East Surrey Regiment. He was born in Morden, Surrey in 1878 and was a General Labourer. He was the Husband of Edith Cross, 48, Wandle Road, S. Wimbledon, and they had four children. He was enlisted into the army at Kingston and died at Salonika on 20th July 1916. He is interred in grave  C. IX. 6. PIETA MILITARY CEMETERY.

Pieta Military Cemetery

Herbert Cruttenden

Service Number 6080 he was a Private in the 8th Battalion of the East Surrey Regiment. He was born in Hastings, East Sussex in 1882 and was a Coal Porter by trade. He was the husband of Adelaide H. Cruttenden, of 50, Milton Rd., Wimbledon and they had two children. He was enlisted into the army in Wimbledon and was killed in action on 9th August 1917 aged 35. He is commemorated on Panel 34.YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL.

Ypres – Menin Gate

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: